Labour’s Bonkers Shadow Cabinet Selection

The road to hell is paved with good intentions.  I suppose that line could be New Labour’s epitaph.  However, it’s still alive and well in the party’s internal democracy.  As with the leadership election rules, the system for selecting their Shadow Cabinet is well-meaning and intended to be democratic.  That is a laudable ambition.  It is certainly something the Conservative Party hasn’t cracked.  Nevertheless, it is difficult to argue with Jack Straw that Labour’s means to this ends, when you take a step back, is frankly ‘barking mad‘.

Poor Ed.  He can’t pick his own team.  Instead he has to go through the next two years surrounded by a Shadow Cabinet put in place thanks to nods, winks and pushes from politicking Unions helping advise their members on where to put their 1s, 2s and 3s.   Straw is convinced the quality of the opposition benches are hurt, he says:

“And what it means is that of the 18 or 19 people in shadow cabinet, probably a dozen [are] capable of being in the Cabinet, half a dozen are not[..]”

So Ed is going into battle with a couple of even dudder duds in his armoury.

The other huge issue for Ed is that when you look at the top ten in the list as finally elected – not a single one of them backed Ed as first preference.  Think about that.  Not one of the top ten members of his team thought he was the best man for leader.

He has his work cut out and starts handicapped by his own party rules.   We should let him get on with it.  As Napoleon used to nearly say “Never interrupt your enemy when he is doing a good job of defeating himself”.

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3 Comments

Filed under Politics, UK, UK Politics, Uncategorized

3 responses to “Labour’s Bonkers Shadow Cabinet Selection

  1. I actually agree with you and Jack Straw on this issue.

    I think that the shadow cabinet should be decided by the leader, after all, as you say, why should s/he work with people he hasn’t chosen himself?

    The current system is out-dated and elections should be every year, not every two.

  2. Tony Blair managed, and he couldn’t even choose which positions to give the winners.

    • Ah – but Blair in his pomp had nigh on super-human people skills (difficult to imagine now!) – young Ed isn’t in the same league on that side of the skill-set.

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